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2 Oct, 2012

Fora Da Lei - ForróNela! - Volume 1 (CDr)

High School Icons, Then and Now. Photos Add Image Add an image Do you have any images for this title? Edit Storyline Lesbian couple Teresa and Lena made national news in Portugal when they applied to get married. Genres: Documentary. Edit Did You Know? Trivia The documentary starts at the Civil Registrar's Office the day the couple applied for a marriage license February 1, and follows several of their battles, concentrating on the basic needs for employment and a house to live, and the difficult relationship of a little daughter and her grandparents.

Add the first question. Edit Details Official Sites: Official site. Country: Portugal. Language: Portuguese English. Color: Color HDV. Edit page. O lume fara sfarsit, vol. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions 6. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about O lume fara sfarsit, vol. Be the first to ask a question about O lume fara sfarsit, vol. Lists with This Book.

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of O lume fara sfarsit, vol. View 1 comment. I wrote my first one a long time ago, and hopefully this one new one is written a little better. Going back, my first seemed sort of childish. So, moving onward! And I must say, it's one of my very, very favorites.

The style is beautiful. Of course, I would expect such a good narration from our heroic main character: Alan Dale.

The whole tale is being written by Alan when he is an old lord, in his 60s, looking back on his adventures as a member of England's most famous group of outlaws of all time.

As a young teenager Alan is forced to join Robin Hood and his band of - and I use this term very loosely - merry men after he steals a pie and basically pisses the sheriff off for no other reason than existing. Robin accepts him into his ranks because he can see that young Alan has lots of potential for thieving. A utter must in Robin's overly logical mind. And Alan is carted off to Sherwood Forest where he begins to learn the ways of the outlaws. Sure, Tuck's still a fat, pious little priest with some badass fighting skills.

Mary Anne is beautiful and pretty much helpless. The Sheriff of Nottingham is a greedy, cowardly bastard. And Guy of Gisbourne is a total asshole. But the world of "Outlaw" is nothing like the happy, laughter filled Forest of "the adventures of Robin Hood" by Howard Pyle. This book should be rated R.

For swearing, violence, and adult content. This Robin Hood novel is filled with blood and gut and gore, a couple of graphic sex scenes, fucked up torture scenes, some cursing, and one highly messed up in the head Robin Hood.

And I loved it all! This book gave a rather good image of the brutality of medieval England. I loved the characters too.

Especially Robin and Alan. Alan was such a great narrator, and I loved learning about this new world along with him. I loved watching him really grow up over the course of the story.

He's stubborn, quick witted, and a total dude. His lust for Cat? Pretty much how any teenage boy behave. He's human; he's not wonderful and perfect like so many main characters. Zoey Redbird anyone? Plus, as a rather pious, sheltered Christian kid, he had a lot of learning to do about other religious and beliefs. It was interesting to see how he slowly got a bit more accepting of others' beliefs.

Even if he never did get over that stuff about Robin and Hern. When the summery part on the back said "meet the godfather of Sherwood" it wasn't fucking kidding. This guy, is no Errol Flynn. He ain't Kevin Costner. Oh yeah, he's charismatic like them. The man needs some serious mental help, people. He's angry, bitter, as clear a trauma victim as there ever was. A influential and charismatic sociopath. He's cold and calculating and cruel. The Hood of "Outlaw" is scary. And I love him. Cannot wait to read the rest of the series.

He is given training in fighting and music, and is with them on many of their adventures, including saving Marie-Anne from having to marry the sheriff. I really liked this one, though.

It is a series and I will continue. Will look forward to reading the next in the series. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Outlaw is a good book with a nice refreshing - and more historically accurate - outlook on the Robin Hood story, but I found it lacking in a couple of areas.

I felt that Outlaw's premise was nice, but maybe hadn't been thought through enough though I feel bad knowing he spent seven years devising this XD. Rather than being a structured tale moving to an ultimate point it seemed to be a case of following Alan around as he went to largely unconnected places for astonishingly short amounts of time I personally couldn't believe that he only spent two months in Winchester whilst seeming to grow up emotionally though only actually gaining a year in all.

I adored the final battle, but felt as though it was there 'to be an ending' not because that was where the story had naturally led the climax to; maybe if Murdac had been a more prominent figure throughout the book it would have made more sense to have him as, ultimately, a 'baddy' character.

Indeed, I felt as though characterisation was pretty thin on the ground - with one exception: Robin. Robin became, not the Robin Hood we all knew, but a savage with a strange ability to both appal and entrance you at exactly the same time.

I found myself falling - with Alan - for his kindness, flattery, and wanting Alan to gain his trust and affection. Major congratulations for a perfect Robin! Alan's emotional growth is depicted well and you feel yourself growing with him into a hardened warrior and not so hardened trouvere xD but I still cannot get my head around the fact that he's supposedly fourteen for the majority of the book and, at still just fourteen, he's part of Robin's inner circle for - to all intensive purposes - no other reason than his ability to sing.

Overall, Outlaw seems to juggle between being a raw historical novel about savage outlaws and the victories they achieve, and being, essentially, a book about trouveres and singing in the 12th Century.

I did think that it got better as it went on - I think you can see Donald maturing as a writer with every turn of the page; his style gradually becomes more subtle thank goodness - it was a bit blunt to begin with! The savage-side of Robin Hood still intrigues me and perhaps when Crusader comes out next year I'll give Donald another try :. View all 14 comments. I have to admit I have avoided reading this book for a long time through a misguided combination of jealousy and the desire to avoid disappointment.

The jealousy spring from my own desire to write a novel that portrayed Robin Hood in a realistic light that was true to the spirit of the original medieval ballads about him.

There is plenty of robbing-not necessarily just from the rich-and very little I have to admit I have avoided reading this book for a long time through a misguided combination of jealousy and the desire to avoid disappointment.

There is plenty of robbing-not necessarily just from the rich-and very little giving to the poor. He does much more though and manages the almost impossible. Alongside the original ballads pretty much all the various and at times contradicting traditions that have grow up around Robin since are incorporated into one compelling, action packed and plausible narrative. The author creates an authentic picture of Twelfth Century England in which all these elements play and keeps the reader enthralled there as the action and there is plenty of it unfolds.

In many ways this is the quintessential novel for fans of the medieval period. Like a modern Ivanhoe, all the elements you would want to see are here: Outlaws, castles, knights, a Jewish character, damsels in distress, dungeons, sieges, battles, witches and Templars, its all here but woven together in a way that avoids cliche. The marketing for the book draws parallels with The Godfather, and this is particularly apt but it is more than just a tale of gangsters in chain mail: At times it slides deep into the territory of that other classic of s cinema, The Wicker Man.

As these are two of my favourite films, suffice to say that I was far from disappointed by the book. Suffice to say, I thoroughly enjoyed this novel, and my regret now is that I avoided it for so long.

The good news is that I now have a whole series of these books to look forward to. Alan Dale is the lowest of the low - essentially a street rat, forced to steal to make a living. Robin Hood, "holding court" in Alan's town of Nottingham.

Alan's mother convinces Robin to take Alan under his wing, and so begins the story of Outlaw. In Outlaw, Robin is no man-in-tights do-gooder, stealing from the rich and giving to the poor. He's a brutal, bloodthirsty bastard ready to kill at the drop of a pin. I haven't read many Robin Hood novels, and I find myself looking for darker, grittier novels to read, so the older children's novels were of little interest.

Outlaw is a coming-of-age tale, with our protagonist Alan Dale being around 13 or 14 at the outset of the novel, but it is without question an adult novel. Graphic violence and sex are abundant, and some comedy also finds its way in, even in the darkest of times. Speaking of graphic violence, the battle scenes are exceptionally done and often described in detail, as is a particular torture scene, which I'll not to discuss so as to keep this review spoiler-free.

The environments, whether the scene is in summer or winter, are described in detail, but not at all in fluffy, boring detail - Donald did an excellent job painting each scene.

Historical accuracy is always a difficult subject to read for one so interested in history as I am. There were no qualms from me going in because, as anyone who has read even a bit about Robin Hood knows, he may not even have existed. The blend of fiction and history was what drew me to Outlaw and eventually the rest of the series was this blend, and Donald could not have done better, down to battle formations and the illness and subsequent death of Henry II, and many other examples.

Angus Donald's Outlaw was a fast-paced, gripping read in which I found myself reading most of it in one sitting, eager for more. If you're looking for a fresh new take on Robin Hood, look no further than Outlaw. It takes skill for a writer to tie up the story into a nice knot at the end and still leave readers begging for more, and luckily for me, The Outlaw Chronicles stand at 5 novels with a sixth on its way.

One of the first movies I can remember watching was the Flynn version of Robin Hood. I have loved Robin Hood ever since. I read Robin Hood retellings whenever I noticed one, even romance book versions. It just sometimes takes me awhile to get to them - but if you're on this website, you know how that is - books bred like rabbits.

So this book, what can I say. I finished it. I didn't put it down in digust. Some of the fight scenes were goo One of the first movies I can remember watching was the Flynn version of Robin Hood. Some of the fight scenes were good. The book is told by Alan Dale as he joins Robin Hood's band. Robin Hood is a godfather figure, until he is not a godfather figure and turns into a nice guy and respects Marie-Ann's desire not to have intercourse until marriage, but if she's raped, it's still her fault.

The problem I had with it was it was so very predcitable. I have no doubt that Donald did research about Robin Hood and the England of the time. He is very clearly letting you know this, which is annoying sometimes but works in others.

I also think Donald loves Robin Hood movies, books, and serieses very much - he seems to be borrow from them. All of them. This isn't to say that borrowing is a bad thing. But there is nothing new about the distallition here. We've seen it. I have to give Donald credit for not adding the Muslim character that seems to be staple since Nasir in Robin of Sherwood.

I am not knocking Robin of Sherwood or Nasir, I love both. However, why does ever prodcution since feel it necessary to add one? Of course, the sequel is in the crusades, so who knows. The plot, to be honest, could use some tightening. Something I found surprising because Scarlett was training alongside Alan, and neither ones was with the band for the longest time. Angus Donald's historical take on Robin Hood is an interesting example of work by a great storyteller who is yet to be a great writer.

Donald, who has clearly researched both the various Robin Hood legends and the historical time period he chooses to set his novel he chooses the reign of Henry II, so a bit earlier than most versions of the legends, which place the bulk of the action in Richard I's reign , has a good grasp of characters and plot, but his language is often lacking nuance and subt Angus Donald's historical take on Robin Hood is an interesting example of work by a great storyteller who is yet to be a great writer.

Donald, who has clearly researched both the various Robin Hood legends and the historical time period he chooses to set his novel he chooses the reign of Henry II, so a bit earlier than most versions of the legends, which place the bulk of the action in Richard I's reign , has a good grasp of characters and plot, but his language is often lacking nuance and subtlety, which is perhaps a choice as his narrator is roughed up version of Alan A Dale a figure who is, interestingly enough, often confused with Will Scarlet, who is a minor character in Donald's book , a peasant, but since Alan achieves some distinction as a troubadour over the course of the novel, it's sort of strange that his narrative style is rather pedestrian.

Still, since Donald packs his book with everything one can put into a medieval saga, it's absolutely entertaining and satisfying to lovers of the genre, even if at some point it seems like every new character who is introduced is a check-off on the list of what goes into these stories: the fair maid, the good queen, the effeminate villain, the dispossessed prodigal, the virtuous pagan, the noble Jew, etc.

Though the book has over fifty characters or so, it's another noticeable flaw that most are never people we spend significant time with, and Donald's inexperience as a writer becomes apparent here, as often he'll scramble to "flesh someone out" in a paragraph or two, only to have them unceremoniously vanish from the story by the end of the chapter.

But then again, Donald is not writing a stand alone book- this is the beginning of a trilogy, or possibly a series, and while his last chapter isn't exactly a cliff-hanger, it's definitely set up of what is to come, and so who is to say if some of Outlaw's undeveloped ideas and figures have a brighter future before them?

A good friend recommended this book to me, since I am also a huge fan of Sharon Kay Penman's and Bernard Cornwell's books.

I won't admit this to my friend, but he was spot on with his recommendation. The story is told very much in the Cornwell style--gritty, violent, and occasionally very gory. But Angus Donald's writing is more well-rounded than Cornwell's. The characters are better fleshed out, and the pacing is eve A good friend recommended this book to me, since I am also a huge fan of Sharon Kay Penman's and Bernard Cornwell's books.

La parola di un fuorilegge non vale niente. Non posso acconsentire alla giustizia al di fuori della legge. Elas lidam constantemente com coisas fora da lei. Loro si occupano in continuazione di cose al di fuori della legge. A quanto pare, dovrai lavorare fuori dalla legge FRED: Numero vissuto fuori dalla legge e solo i fuorilegge non mi hanno giudicato. Agora posso ser um fora da lei para sempre. Ora potrei restare un fuorilegge a vita.

Como referenciar: fora da lei in Dicionário infopédia da Língua Portuguesa [em linha]. Porto: Porto Editora, Porto: Porto Editora, [consult. ].

About : Guzil

9 thoughts on “Fora Da Lei - ForróNela! - Volume 1 (CDr)”

  1. Clique agora para baixar e ouvir grátis FORRÓNELA VOL. 1 COM KATIA DE TRÓIA postado por GERONIMO CARVALHO em 12/11/, e que já está com Downloads e Plays!
  2. ForróNela - Fora da Lei (Letra e música para ouvir) - Me apaixonei de um jeito tão / inconsequente sem saber o / que podia acontecer / Os meus amigos falam que .
  3. Página Inicial Forró ForróNela Fora da Lei. Fora da Lei Tocar/Pausar Repetir Volume / Configuração Tela inteira. Outros vídeos desta música. ver + Repetir Repetir Qualidade Automático. Automático; Diminuir vídeo Aumentar vídeo Tela inteira.
  4. Clique agora para baixar e ouvir grátis ForróNela Vol. 1 - Abra o seu coração (Com Kátia de Tróia) postado por Robson Camara em 05/08/, e que já está com Downloads e Plays!
  5. Provided to YouTube by ONErpm Fora da Lei (Ao Vivo) · Nosso Sentimento · Rodrigo Rodrigues Fora-da-Lei ℗ Nosso Sentimento Released on: Auto-genera.
  6. Jan 22,  · Provided to YouTube by ONErpm Fora da Lei (Ao Vivo) · Nosso Sentimento · Rodrigo Rodrigues Liberdade ℗ Nosso Sentimento Released on: Auto-generated by YouTube.
  7. Fora da Lei Play all. Eu Ando Tão Besta Agora ou Sonhos Nunca Mais - Sérgio Valério - Duration: 68 seconds. Festival do Minuto. 53, views; 10 years ago;
  8. Aug 20,  · ForróNela VolCD Eu Vi A Lua Brilhar(Completo) 9-Por Você Linda O Importante é Amar Me Dá um Beijo Dois Apaixonados Lençóis Amassados Fora da Lei Coração(Bônus.

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