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2 Oct, 2012

Yes - Magnification (CD, Album)

The album barely made it onto the bottom rung of The Ladder in the album charts upon its release, only reaching No. K, and No. S Billboard , and only lasted one week in both charts. Magnification has been a Big Generator of debate amongst Yes fans over the years, contrasting between those who love the album, and others who regard it as something of a bad Tormato in the Yes canon.

I really like the Magnification album though, and if you Open Your Eyes and ears and give the album a listen, then maybe you'll gain the Keys to Ascension too, or maybe you won't, whichever the case may be. Anyway, before I Fly from Here tonight, I'll post the ten Yessongs from the album below so you can judge the album for yourselves.

Very good album and maybe the last really good one they did although I still probably prefer the ladder over it by just a little bit. Psychedelic Paul wrote I'll post the ten Yessongs from the album below so you can judge the album for yourselves. What a trip! I listened to Magnification last night, excellent album for the most part. Give Love Each Day is the highlight for me, though the whole thing is quite strong even for a Yes album.

I think I remember that the conceit for this album was a de-emphasis on keyboards, in favor of acoustic orchestral arrangements. Kinda ballsy, and it worked great.

Go figure. My other avatar is a Porsche It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle if it is lightly greased. I think it's a very good album. The band disbanded for a few years again after making two highly successful albums and Big Generator , and after 4 years they returned with Union, a collaboration between present Yes members and long departed ones, which was surprisingly bad.

After Union the band returned with Talk, another poppy Yes album, but better than the two 80s albums. Wakeman decided to leave the band once again and he was replaced by some other guy named Billy Sherwood. They produced the album Open Your Eyes which was quite similar to Talk, only a bit better, a sign of things to come.

Then came The Ladder, which was again an improvement of the former album. And finally we come where we were waiting for. Magnification is the latest album by Yes, and surprisingly, their best since the late 70s imo, some might rival this.

Now, why did I start this review talking about keyboards? Well, that's because there aren't any on this album apart from some piano here and there. Yes has been reformed to a quartet of rock musicians Steve Howe, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire and Alan White plus a piece orchestra led by Larry Groupe who is a notable soundtrack-composer. This might sound weird, but the orchestra actually does a great job. Therefore, let's evaluate the tracks: 1.

Magnification: The album starts off with some happy sounding guitar, and soon the other instruments including the orchestra, excluding the drums fall in. The orchestra is used nicely as the backbeat for this track, adding some sphere. Soon the drums come in and the track gets more rocking by the minute.

The track then evolves from riff to riff, using the orchestra to it's full extent, for 7 minutes, never getting boring. Overall the track isn't really innovating by any means, i's the standard 90s Yes track but with some extra instrumentation which makes it interesting.

The orchestra really shines on this track, it's not always as apparent on the album. Spirit Of Survival: Magnification flows easily into Spirit Of Survival, which once again starts with guitar well, after some a capella singing by Anderson , although less happy sounding.

It proves to not be a copy of Magnification though, seeing as it actually gets quite hard-rocking. The orchestra is here used in a more bombastic and simple way than in the title track. Squire shines on this track. Don't Go: After two somewhat longer tracks respectively 7 and 6 minutes we get Don't Go which has a more orthodox length of 4 and a half minutes, it's also more poppy than the two former tracks, reminiscent of Talk.

The orchestra doesn't add too much to Don't Go actually, it could have worked perfectly without it. An enjoyable but forgettable although it's rather catchy track nonetheless. Give Love Each Day: The first track to start with the orchestra playing solo, giving a nice atmosphere to the track right from the start.

It feels like the orchestra is planning to play solo the whole track, but don't be fooled, the band comes in at the 2 minute mark with some interesting sounding guitar and Anderson singing some stuff I hardly ever listen to his lyrics, seeing as they aren't too interesting mostly.

It doesn't take long before the drums kick in and the track again gets blown to epic status during the almost 8 minutes of music. AllMusic relies heavily on JavaScript.

Please enable JavaScript in your browser to use the site fully. Blues Classical Country. Electronic Folk International. Jazz Latin New Age. Aggressive Bittersweet Druggy. Energetic Happy Hypnotic. Romantic Sad Sentimental. Still unable to rate atm.

Something around a Yes Magnification 2. Review Summary: If Magnification proves anything, it is that Yes shouldn't try new things. Rank: for With keyboardist Igor Khoroshev splitting ways with the band, there came another personnel shift, and even though The Ladder was, when seen in a certain light, a pretty decent comeback, this was still a group struggling to regain some of their former creativity. As of yet, Rick Wakeman was not interested in rejoining the group, and instead of looking for one new player, the remaining quarter simply hired 60 of them.

To be straight, the orchestra proves to be more of a downfall than a contribution to Magnification. The idea of merging one with a rock band, particularly a progressive one, has been bravely attempted by many in the past, and only a few of the original pioneers actually managed to get it right e. The Moody Blues, Renaissance. In the current century and with a band this age, fortune does not as easily smile on such a combination. Throw in an epic-length or two, a few ballads and rockers, not to forget a two-minute interlude with no clear purpose, and there is your new album.

Clearly, Yes are not very good at that. Tweet Recent reviews by this author. Genesis Calling All Stations. Genesis We Can't Dance. Genesis Invisible Touch.

Magnification is the nineteenth studio album by progressive rock band Yes, released in It was the band’s first album of the new century, and their second with a full orchestra (the first being Time and a Word from ). It marked the band’s last studio album to date with vocalist Jon Anderson.4/5().

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8 thoughts on “Yes - Magnification (CD, Album)”

  1. Magnification is the strongest, freshest set of new Yes material in a long time. Having thoroughly exhausted the world's supply of classically inclined rock keyboard players, the four remaining members of Yes have dispensed with that perennially bothersome ivory-tickling slot altogether/5().
  2. For the first time in decades Yes paired with a symphony for "Magnification." It works in places and not in others. The band are to be commended for experimenting with new musical styles rather than more of the same old-same old Yes formula. Parts of the album are quite pretty, but others tend to meander/5(66).
  3. The "Magnification" album was the last album of new material from Yes with Jon Anderson/5(18).
  4. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the CD release of Magnification on Discogs. Label: Eagle Records - EDGLT,Eagle Records - GAS EDGL • Format: 2x, CD HDCD, Album, Limited Edition, Numbered • Country: UK & Europe • Genre: Rock • Style: Art Rock, Prog Rock, Symphonic Rock4/5(31).
  5. Feb 20,  · Magnification is the nineteenth studio album by progressive rock band Yes, released in It was the band’s first album of the new century, and their second with a full orchestra (the first being Time and a Word from ). It marked the band’s last studio album to date with vocalist Jon Anderson.4/5().
  6. Magnificationis YES‘ nineteenth studio album, released in It was the band’s first album of the new century, and their second with a full orchestra (the first being Time and a Wordfrom ). It marked the band’s last studio album to date with vocalist Jon Anderson.
  7. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Magnification on Discogs. Label: Ear Music - EMX • Format: Vinyl LP, Album, Reissue Vinyl LP, Album, Etched, Reissue • Country: Europe • Genre: Rock • Style: Art Rock, Prog Rock, Symphonic Rock.
  8. Released in , the Time and a Word album featured a string section, but the complete integration is what makes Magnification a superior work. The material on the CD is pretty standard modern Yes fare, but the addition of that symphony really does create a whole new texture.6/

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